Jan
25

Clean Showerhead With Apple Cider Vinegar

Author redlaw    Category Shower Head     Tags , , , ,

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If you notice discolouration on your shower head (chalky white, green or brown), you’ve got some for of calcium, limescale or rust. While it’s not a health risk, it means your shower head’s performance is going to be sluggish, leaving you with a less than exciting shower experience. Here’s what to do.

Many brands make sprays specially designed to remove limescale. If you’ve got a heavy build-up that is proving resistant to vinegar, then your local supermarket will most likely stock an array of sprays that will do the job. However, be careful when using these that you don’t spray overhead and accidentally get chemicals in your eyes.

When vinegar just won’t do the job, you can use a commercial limescale remover like Cif Bathroom Spray. These are specially designed to be relentless on tough limescale stains so you can clean your shower head quickly with minimal effort! Just follow the directions on the label.

Remove the shower head from the shower arm and place it in a bucket or other container deep enough so the head will be covered with the cleaning material. Use a rag to cover the nut connecting the shower head to the shower arm. With the rag in place use some locking pliers or a wrench to loosen the nut. For more information about removing your shower head, view how to remove/replace a shower head.

Take a soft cloth and polish the shower head, wipe until dry and there are no water spots. The shower head can then be screwed back onto the hose. Turn on the shower to flush out any residue the toothbrush didn’t get.

A quick internet search on how to descale any household object will nearly always lead to white vinegar. Even sensitive items like sterilisers for baby bottles are in safe hands. When using vinegar to descale a shower head, the first thing to get right is the type of vinegar. Malt vinegar isn’t particularly effective and brown vinegar may stain, so white distilled vinegar is best.

You can use these products to make the job mucheasier:

Disconnect the showerhead. To disconnect the showerhead, unscrew the nut at the shower arm. Take care not to mar the fixture’s finish. Use a wrench rather than pliers. Cushion your tool with a rag while you work.

If you don’t feel up to the task of removing the shower head to clean it, or for some reason you cannot remove your shower head, you can still effectively clean the mineral buildup off your shower head while it is on the shower arm. Be aware, however, that usually this method will take quite a bit longer since you don’t heat the vinegar.

Many cleaning products are specifically designed to combat limescale, and these products are easy to use (and often take much less time than the vinegar method!). Just follow the directions on the label, take any necessary safety precautions, and test the product in a small area first before proceeding. Make sure to rinse the shower head thoroughly before using the shower as normal.

If you have a fixed shower head, make up the same solution of distilled white vinegar and water and half fill the plastic bag. Place the bag over the shower head, ensuring the whole head is submerged. Tie the bag securely on to the pipe behind the head with an elastic band or some hard-wearing string. Again, leave it overnight, then pour some fresh, soapy water over it to rinse it.

Use some tape, or if your shower head is small enough you can use a rubber band, and secure the bag around the shower head. Keep the tape on the plastic! Tape is really hard to remove from metal surfaces and may damage the finish of your shower arm or head.

Rinse the showerhead. Run a sharp blast of water through the showerhead by holding it upside down underneath a faucet. Your goal is to rinse loosened debris out through the opening that connects to the shower arm.

Instead I ignored it and this morning when my husband went in the shower, the hose exploded because of too much pressure and he got scalded (and the shower head is now broken and has to be replaced GRRRRRRR).

The acetic acid in white vinegar acts as a solvent, which helps dissolve the mineral deposits hogging space in your showerhead’s passageways. Allowing your showerhead to bask in vinegar for an hour or more will help dissolve the buildup so that it washes away once the shower is turned on. 

Gather your supplies. One way to clean your showerhead is by taking it off the pipe and soaking it in vinegar. If you are unable to remove your showerhead, or if you simply do not want to, then click here. Here is what you will need for this method:

Don’t use baking soda. Sometimes it will clump up if there’s water in your showerhead. Just use the vinegar. It’s the best way. If you need to, flush out the showerhead with hot water and repeat the process until it’s clean. It may take a few times if you have mineral build up. It’s especially bad with well water.

OK, 12 hours has passed…carefully remove the bag and dump the vinegar down the drain. If you want to clean your drain in the process, dump some baking soda down the drain before pouring out the vinegar and your drain will get cleaned as well. Once the vinegar is emptied, run the shower for a minute and let the vinegar rinse off (the smell will go away too). Within minutes your shower will work wonderfully and you’ll be so glad you tried this out!

Residue can be scrubbed away with an old toothbrush. Focus on the nozzles, this is where most of the limescale build-up will be. Gently scrub over any residue and rinse with cold water. Do this until all the residue has gone.

Remove the baggie. Wipe off the shower head with a cleaning rag. If the shower head is still dirty, try scrubbing gently with an old toothbrush or cleaning the jets with a paperclip. If you find your shower head has really stubborn deposits or stains, try repeating this process until all of the deposits are gone.

Many shower heads have flexible rubber nozzles. You can dislodge mineral buildup in these nozzles by simply massaging each nozzle with your finger. You can also try gently scrubbing the nozzles with a toothbrush.

First, make sure to avoid contact with the eyes. If any vinegar gets in your eyes, promptly rinse the entire eye with fresh water until the sting has completely dissipated. Also, although it’s safe to use vinegar to clean areas where children play, you will want to do so when they are not present. Like adults, children should not be consuming vinegar in any way. 

Remove the shower head from the vinegar, and wipe it off with a rag. The mineral deposits should wipe right off. If the deposits do not come off easily try soaking the shower head again for another 30 minutes or so. Also, for stubborn deposits or stains, use an old toothbrush to scrub them gently. A paperclip can also be used to clear the little jet holes in the shower head.

As we’re sure you’re aware, many common household cleaners contain harsh chemicals that are toxic when in contact with your skin or eyes, and your lungs when sprayed into the air. Using such chemicals can cause allergic reactions for some, but there’s good news! Many of these chemical cleaners can be replaced with common kitchen items, like vinegar. Vinegar is safe for you and your family, and when used properly can be a powerful tool in your cleaning arsenal. In addition, vinegar is very inexpensive when compared to household cleaners. You can find a gallon of vinegar at the grocery store for a fraction of the price of one small bottle of chemical cleaner.

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