Jan
24

Easy Way To Clean Shower Head

Author redlaw    Category Shower Head     Tags ,

Is deficiency of knowledge stopping you from proceeding when it comes to shower head cleaning? You are not the only one. This happens all of the time – you have to decide something however don’t feel like you fully understand enough. One thing which helped me in my making decisions regarding shower head cleaning was this informative article on this subject. It truly cleared things up.

Not only did it list everything I was looking for however it told me what I really should be cautious about also. If you make the wrong decision because you didn’t have all the info you required it is going to be the wrong decision. I needed help and it was in this informative article. Read it and get the same help.

If you notice discolouration on your shower head (chalky white, green or brown), you’ve got some for of calcium, limescale or rust. While it’s not a health risk, it means your shower head’s performance is going to be sluggish, leaving you with a less than exciting shower experience. Here’s what to do.

Scrub the showerhead using an old toothbrush, then turn the water back on. Focus on the base of the showerhead, where the water comes out, as this is the area that will get the most buildup. Turn the water back on again to flush more residue out. Keep scrubbing the showerhead and turning the water on until you cannot see anymore mineral residue.

If you find your shower head looking dingy, you’re losing spray power, or there’s random jets shooting all over, it’s probably time to clean your shower head. Even if you don’t have hard water, many people experience a build up of mineral deposits on their shower head after a while. Aside from making your shower head look dirty, these deposits can often times block the jet openings on the shower head preventing it from producing the desired spray. A good soak and scrub can eliminate this in just a few minutes. But, before reaching for a harsh, toxic chemical to clean your shower head, consider using a more eco-friendly cleaning method.

Over time, hard-water minerals in tap water build up and clog the spray holes in showerheads. Fix this problem by removing the showerhead and cleaning it. Buy a lime removing product to loosen the scale, or soak the head overnight in vinegar (either white or apple cider). Check the owner’s manual or manufacturer’s website to confirm that vinegar won’t harm the finish.

I use distilled vinegar, before I cottoned on to buying it in 5 gallon cartons from the cash & carry I used to use Sarsons distilled but it was very expensive. In an emergency I have used malt vinegar but the smell did not seem to evaporate nearly as much as distilled when it dried.

If you can’t remove your showerhead or simply want to skip that step, you can soak your showerhead by using a rubber band and a plastic bag. (Note: This method is best for showerheads made with chrome, stainless steel, or other protected metal surfaces.)

You can use these products to make the cleaning muchfaster & easier:

Carefully remove the showerhead and open the holes using the steps shown in Photos 1 and 2. If the showerhead is too stuck to remove, try filling a plastic bag with vinegar, tying the top of the bag around the top of the showerhead and submerging it overnight in the vinegar.

Occasionally when we lived in London, we would put a couple of bags of washing soda in the water tank in the loft (hot water) and let it sit there overnight then let it run through the system, it really kept the limescale down, I used to do all my washing with that water on a saturday or sunday morning, the old fart would swap the washing maching hoses over so the machine filled with hot water then put them back, id do all thecurtains and bedding and towels etc then our clothes and by that time the washing soda had gone and we could get baths etc

If you have a severe problem with limescale you can use a chemical limescale remover. Use the same methods as above, but take care to read the instructions as some materials can be ruined by the use of certain cleaners. Don’t soak for too long as these harsher chemicals will reduce the time it takes to dissolve deposits. You should also take care to rinse the showerhead completely before using the shower.

Showerheads often spray unevenly because their tiny holes have gotten plugged with mineral deposits. In order for water to flow freely, you need to remove these deposits. To do that, you may want to soak the showerhead in vinegar. And that may mean removing the showerhead from the shower arm.

Turn the water off and polish the showerhead with a soft cloth. You can use a microfiber cloth or a piece of flannel. Gently buff the surface of the showerhead with the cloth until it is dry and you can no longer see any water spots.

Reassemble and reinstall your showerhead. First wrap new plumbing tape around the threads of the shower arm to ensure a good seal. Reattach the showerhead to the shower arm using the wrench. Protect the fixture’s finish with soft rags or towels while you’re working.

How do I put washing soda in the machine? With the soap (we use the Faith in Nature liquid thingy – bought in bulk of course hehe) or in the conditioner space (we don’t use any conditioner, find it a waste of time and money and we like our towels ROUGH!!). Can this be done to the dishwasher as well?

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